Chikoop Newsfeed Chikoop Newsfeed


TRAVEL

My voyage through a world of language in just one word: snow

Missing the wild regions where I have worked, I took a linguistic trip from Asia to the Andes, via Russia and Finland, instead

A few years ago I spent a winter on Upernavik, a rocky island of 1,000 inhabitants off the north-west coast of Greenland. I’d been invited to Baffin Bay as part of a programme for international writers and artists to create new work about climate at one of the most northerly museums in the world.

The museum director emailed a warning in advance: the winter was better for introspection than exploration. Sure enough, I found I couldn’t leave the island, nor – with waist-high snowdrifts and continuous darkness – could I walk far around it. My daily excursions were limited to the path I dug from my cabin to the grocery store, or to the museum, where there was always coffee and a warm welcome.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

Vaccine passports 'essential' for resumption of international travel

World Tourism Organisation calls for global coordination, standardised certification and harmonised testing protocols

Vaccine passports must become essential travel documents in order to restart international tourism.

The recommendation comes from the Global Tourism Crisis Committee, which met in Madrid this week to discuss measures to ensure the safe resumption of international travel. It called for international health and travel bodies to step up the coordination of a standardised digital certification system, as well as harmonised testing protocols.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

New rewilding project teaches tour guides to offer fresh look at travel

The environment and tourism can benefit from a programme teaching tour guides about returning nature to a wilder state

Tour guides across the world are being taught about rewilding as part of a new training programme that aims to create economic opportunities within wilder landscapes.

The training is run by not-for-profit organisation Rewilding Europe, which is working to return nature to a wilder state across eight regions of Europe by removing human management and reintroducing certain species. This vision includes rejuvenating the tourism industry by attracting visitors to remote areas, such as the southern Carpathians in Romania or the Velebit mountains on the Croatian coast, with the possibility of encountering wild animals including lynx and wolves – and creating jobs within local communities.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

10 songs that bring back memories of my travels: Garth Cartwright's playlist

Inspirational musicians from New Orleans, Jamaica, Macedonia and New Zealand are among those who have kept the author going during lockdown

I’m a Kiwi who’s lived in London since 1991 and the pandemic made me both yearn for and fear for my family, so far away. To calm my huge angst, especially when my father’s health collapsed in March, I listened to music constantly, obsessively, jazz serving as a balm to my worried mind. Dad died in late June, not of the virus – a fall led to him departing this world. I mourned and celebrated his life with music, especially Horace Silver’s funky, warm eulogy to his father. Released on Blue Note in 1965, Silver’s instrumental reminds me of great jazz clubs in London, New York, Havana, and of the old fella – even if his musical enthusiasms never moved beyond Gilbert and Sullivan.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

10 inspiring hobbies taken up by readers during lockdown

Using Shakespeare plays, mum’s cooking and even Lego as inspiration, our tipsters – and their kids – have discovered ingenious ways not just of de-stressing, but of feeling more alive

This is about my autistic daughter’s hobby. She’s nine, and since last March has become an avid birdspotter and photographer. It’s been great to be outside finding nature in the city, and to see her thrive and grow, walking to and exploring local parks. She’s now got an amazing mentor – wildlife artist and photographer Alfie Bowen – and has been winning competitions and had her photos published. She told me: “2020 was the best year ever … less stress because of less school, and I could be the person I am meant to be.” What more could a parent ask for?
Emma

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

Noodle soup ties me to the coming year and my Japanese roots – plus the recipe

For this Asian-American novelist, soba noodles flecked with gold embody new year traditions

Every year my mother would make a bowl of Japanese New Year’s Eve noodles for my American father and me. “Just this one tradition,” she would entreat; she didn’t like American New Year, and longed for Japanese-style festivities. One year, I found one of my noodles tied in a knot, which she assured me was a sign of good fortune. I wasn’t so sure. I didn’t even really like noodles.

Related: Subtle and soothing: my obsession with Thai massaman curry – plus the recipe

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

The joy of steps: 20 ways to give purpose to your daily walk

Has the novelty of a prescribed stroll long since worn off? From tracking animals to uncovering hidden history, here’s how to discover a new world in your neighbourhood

The weather is rubbish, there is nowhere to go and, bereft of the joys of spring, the daily lockdown walk can feel pointless. But, of course, it is not: the mental and physical health perks of exercise are immune to seasonal changes. We need to gallivant around outside in daylight so that our circadian rhythms can regulate sleep and alertness. (Yes, even when the sky is resolutely leaden, it is still technically daylight.) Walking warms you up, too; when you get back indoors, it will feel positively tropical.

But if meeting these basic needs isn’t enough to enthuse you, there are myriad ways to add purpose to your stride and draw your attention to the underappreciated joys of winter walking.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

10 of the best virtual travel experiences for 2021

Travel the world through this new crop of virtual experiences, from online guide walks to film festivals, wine-tasting to birdwatching

Starting from their artisanal chocolate shop in the De Wallen red light district, husband-and-wife team Ian and Salomé have devised a tour of Amsterdam that, right now, shows its canals quieter than you’re ever likely to see them in person. The tour is organised through Vancouver-based ToursByLocals, which has launched more than 150 virtual experiences since the pandemic began. Tours cover many destinations and topics, from ghost-hunting in Kyoto to African-American culture in Harlem. Sessions are livestreamed and 100% of the cost can be redeemed against the purchase of a future, in-person tour with the same guide.
One-hour Amsterdam tour every Sunday; £70 for up to six screens, toursbylocals.com

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

Semi-solo hiking brings me the gift of time alone, and the joy of reuniting

Needing solitude in lockdown but wanting her partner’s presence, our writer came up with the idea of taking opposite walking routes

On my 13th birthday, my sister gave me a pale pink card with a cat playing a harp. There was a halo above its head and the words “My sister, the angel.” I smiled and opened the card to read the message inside: “Always harping on about something”.

I laughed because it was true: I was a talkative child. In fact, later that day, a different sister gave me the very same card. Two decades on, I’m still a talker. I thrive on sparring, debating, gossiping and teasing. I solve problems by talking them through, be it the convoluted plot of a movie or a thorny personal issue. This works perfectly well when I have people to talk to. Under lockdown, however, I’ve only had my partner, Peter.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

A virtual tour of Peru through films, food, books and music

We may not be able to travel at the moment, but our new series of virtual guides brings the world to you – starting with a cultural tour of Peru

There’s something fitting about a virtual guide to Peru. For would-be conquistadores, it was a land of fantasy and imagination. The very name of the country would have conjured up illusions of untold treasures, Inca emperors, wild beasts and heathen practices. Lima was the seat of Spain’s South American imperial territories for 300 years; it was where you had to be if you wanted to acquire booty, land, or influence. But it was traversed by impassable mountains and treacherous rivers, fringed by dark jungles in the east and uncharted seas to the west.

Explorers chased visions and mirages across Peru, too. Francisco de Orellana, the first European to explore the Amazon, in 1541, reported pitched battles between female warriors straight out of myth. Machu Picchu “discoverer” Hiram Bingham called one of the sites he unearthed the “Plain of Ghosts”. Archaeologists are still searching for lost cities – and occasionally finding one, as happened in 2002 when a team led by American Gary Ziegler and British writer and explorer Hugh Thomson identified Cota Coca in the Vilcabamba area of southern Peru.

Continue reading...
TRAVEL

From dolphins to rewilding: 11 environment-aware holidays for 2021

From rewilding to marine conservation, these breaks for later in the year have a restorative effect on nature – and holidaymakers, too

The idea of rewilding – moving away from current forestry and agricultural techniques and allowing nature to thrive – is gaining ground.

Continue reading...
Copyright 2016 | Chikoop.com | All Rights Reserved.